What is Biochar?

BIOCHAR

Biochar Holds Big Promise For
Combating Climate Change.
Biochar is a solid material obtained from the carbonisation of biomass. Carbonisation (through technologies such as pyrolysis or gasification) takes place during thermal decomposition of organic material (biomass such as wood, manure or leaves) under limited supply of oxygen, at temperatures ranging from 350 – 700°C.
Biochar can be distinguished from charcoal, used mainly as a fuel, in that the ultimate application is use as a soil amendment with the intention to improve soil functions and to reduce emissions from biomass that would otherwise naturally degrade to greenhouse gases.

Soil Conditioner

Biochar serves as a carrier for Microorganisms and Organic Fertilizer and improves Cation Exchange Capacity.

Animal Farming

Added to Animal Fodder Biochar helps to prevent the need of Antibiotics.

Decontamination

Soil substrates: plantable soil substrates for use in cleaning waste water, in particular contaminated by heavy metals

The carbon in biochar resists degradation and can hold carbon in soils for hundreds to thousands of years.

Sustainable Biochar Is A Powerfully Simple Tool To Combat Climate Change.

 

This 2,000 year-old practice converts agricultural waste into a soil enhancer that can hold carbon, boost food security, and discourage deforestation. Biochar also has appreciable carbon sequestration value. The carbon in biochar resists degradation and can hold carbon in soils for hundreds to thousands of years. These (“carbon negative”) properties are measurable and verifiable in a carbon emission offset protocol. Sustainable biochar production can create oil and gas by-products that can be used as fuel, providing clean, renewable energy. The most used carbonisation process is pyrolysis where the supply of oxygen is restricted.

The Journey After Carbonisation

Biochar is often too valuable for it to be sequestered (worked in to the soil) right away without it first being used for more beneficial purposes. Our focus is on using biochar as a feed supplement in the dairy industry and as an agent in the biogas industry. Other examples (outside the farming industry) are as storage for volatile nutrients, as an adsorber in the material for functional clothing, as insulation in the building industry, as energy storage in batteries and as filter in a sewage plant.

Boosts Food Quality

Biochar in soil amendment converts agricultural waste into a soil enhancer that can hold carbon, boost food security, increase soil biodiversity and discourage deforestation. The process creates a fine-grained, highly porous charcoal that helps soils retain nutrients and water. Higher Microbial Biodiversity and Stronger Enzyme Activity in soil is due to the application of Biochar. It reduces diseases from harmful bacteria and CH4 (methane) generation in the soil and increases soil carbon and humus formation. Biochar can be an important tool to increase food security and cropland diversity in areas with severely depleted soils, scarce organic resources, inadequate water and chemical fertilizer supplies. Biochar also improves water quality and quantity by increasing soil retention of nutrients and agrochemicals for plant and crop utilization. More nutrients stay in the soil instead of leaching into groundwater and causing pollution.

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